laptop-mobile-tablet-device-1

Get the Highest Quality Training Content

GET A TRAINING DEMO  >>

From the Blog

afi_09_loading_flatbed_inside_warehouse_cam2
Top 4 Reasons You’re Neglecting Warehouse Safety Training
Read More

laptop-mobile-tablet-device-1

Get the Highest Quality Training Content

GET A TRAINING DEMO  >>

From the Blog

Spotted Lanternfly Nymphs
Spotted Lanternfly FAQ
Read More

laptop-mobile-tablet-device-1

Get the Highest Quality Training Content

GET A TRAINING DEMO  >>

From the Blog

afi_05_truck_turning_left_cam2
Never Buy Training You Haven't Seen First Yourself
Read More

Where Injuries and Property Damage Meet

NEW! Trailer Door Safety

This training focuses on the safe operation of the rear doors of the trailer, as well as how to inspect the doors prior to a trip. It covers Overhead, Roll Up and Swing Doors. Also covers climbing into and out of the trailer.

Trailer Doors Seem Safe

Trailer doors seem simple enough, right? Yet they take and deliver the most damage, either because they're not secured before backing or because the wind takes them, or cargo falls against them. It can lead to banging the door against the dock, crashing into the driver, or worse. Expensive damage or injuries can result.

This new lesson — Safe Operation of Trailer Doors — focuses on trailer door safety, and all that entails.

Getting Into and Out of Trailers

In addition to learning how to do a pre-trip inspection of trailer doors, your truck drivers will learn how to safely climb into and out of trailers. For medium-duty trucks that make a lot of stops, they may be equipped with a ladder, fold-out stairs or lift gate. Or your driver may be delivering to a place without a dock.

trailer door safetyOne of the most frequent causes of driver injury is getting into and out of the cab. The next most frequent cause is getting into and out of the trailer. This lesson beautifully illustrates the safe methods. And more importantly, it explains why they're more safe.

For example, when exiting the trailer, you'll sometimes see drivers grab the door's safety strap and jump to the ground. That can lead to sprained shoulders, turned ankles, and awkward landings. The safer method is to lower the door so the driver can reach it from the ground, then go down to their hands and knees and back out of the truck. By keeping their upper body bent over the trailer, they can maintain three points of contact as they exit.

Trailer Door Safety Content

Safe Operation of Trailer Doors
Overhead or Roll Up Doors
Pre- and Post Trip on a Roll Up
Operation of a Roll Up Door
Closing an Overhead Door
Climbing onto the ICC Bumper
Climbing into a Trailer Safely
Climbing Out of a Trailer Safely
Swing Doors
Pre- and Post-Trip on Swing Doors
Opening a Swing Door Safely
Closing a Swing Door Safely
Preventing a Swing Door Collision

Subscribe To Our Blog

Posts by Topic

See More
New call-to-action

You may also like:

Top 4 Reasons You’re Neglecting Warehouse Safety Training

When you’re busy, it’s a lot easier to say “no,” than “yes." Countless time-crunched safety managers put off safety trai...

Improve Fuel Efficiency With Straight Truck Safety Training

Would you spend $5 a month to prevent a $335,000 accident claim? What if that $5 a month could also improve your fleet's...

The 'Don't Delay, Start Today' One-Year Training Plan

The Problem: Crashes and Injuries Keep Happening Incident-related expenses such as insurance premiums, deductibles and d...